A Travellerspoint blog

May 2017

A Country Walk

A lake and some bluebell woods.

When we stay at my husband's brothers house, he and his family usually take us somewhere in Buckinghamshire or Bedfordshire for a walk. This year they took us to College Lake.

College Lake is a nature reserve near Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. It occupies the site of a former chalk quarry. We had a lovely walk around the lake, apart from being plagued by flies on one side of it.

College Lake has parking, a shop, a cafe and clean toilets.

All around the lake and even around the car park was covered in tiny yellow cowslips when we visited.

cowslips.

cowslips.

Ready to set off.

Ready to set off.

College Lake.

College Lake.

College Lake.

College Lake.

Black sheep, College Lake.

Black sheep, College Lake.

Primroses by the lake.

Primroses by the lake.

On the way back to my brother-in -law's house we drove through Dockey Wood, Ashridge, Hertfordshire. These woods are carpeted with bluebells every April and May. We did not go for a walk here. We just drove through and stopped briefly to take photos.

The bluebell woods.

The bluebell woods.

The bluebell woods.

The bluebell woods.

Posted by irenevt 05:58 Archived in England Comments (3)

Chester

Visiting Friends

We travelled from Penkridge to Chester for the day to visit a friend. Chester is the county town of Cheshire. It is famous for its old wooden black and white buildings.

Shortly after we left the station we passed the Shropshire Union Canal and noticed the steam mill dating from 1834. This was originally a warehouse for a seed company. Nowadays it has been converted into offices.

The Steam Mill on the canal.

The Steam Mill on the canal.

We walked along the Foregate which is a shopping street lined with wonderful old black and white wooden buildings, most of which are now shops, or pubs or restaurants. We passed through the Eastgate with its famous clock. Apparently it is the most photographed clock in England after Big Ben. Eastgate is located at the site of the original entrance to the Roman fortress of Deva Victrix, the old Roman settlement which eventually developed into Chester.

Old wooden buildings, Chester.

Old wooden buildings, Chester.

Eastgate Clock.

Eastgate Clock.

Looking through the Eastgate.

Looking through the Eastgate.

We met our friend, who lives in Chester, outside Chester's wonderful old cathedral. Chester Cathedral was originally founded as a Benedictine abbey in 1092. It is dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Entry to the cathedral is free.

Chester Cathedral.

Chester Cathedral.

Chester Cathedral.

Chester Cathedral.

Our friend took us on a walk around Chester's old city walls. These walls were started by the Romans when they established the fortress of Deva Victrix between 70 and 80 AD. They have been improved many times throughout their history. They stretch right round the ancient heart of Chester and are almost two miles long. Some stretches of wall were being restored during our visit.

Chester city walls.

Chester city walls.

At one point the city walls pass by Chester Race Course. Chester Racecourse, known as the Roodee, is the oldest and smallest racecourse in England. Racing here dates back to the early sixteenth century.

Chester Racecourse.

Chester Racecourse.

The next sight on our walk was Chester Castle perched on a little hill overlooking the River Dee. Chester Castle was built in 1070 by Hugh Lupus, the first Earl of Chester.

Chester Castle.

Chester Castle.

We cut off the walls shortly after the castle to go and have a cup of coffee in our friend's house. He lived very near another beautiful old black and white wooden building.

Ye Olde King's Head.

Ye Olde King's Head.

After coffee, we took a stroll through Chester's beautiful Grosvenor Park and a walk down to the river to see the Queen's park Bridge.

Grosvenor Park.

Grosvenor Park.

Richard Grosvenor, Second Marquess of Westminster

Richard Grosvenor, Second Marquess of Westminster

On Queens Bridge.

On Queens Bridge.

On Queen's Bridge.

On Queen's Bridge.

Finally we strolled passed the lovely ruins of St John's Church and the remains of the Roman amphitheatre before heading off for dinner.

St John's Church.

St John's Church.

The Roman amphitheatre.

The Roman amphitheatre.

Posted by irenevt 01:01 Archived in England Comments (1)

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